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Old 07-01-2008, 07:55 PM
NCHunter NCHunter is offline
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Default Clothes for elk hunt

My wife and I are planning a DIY elk hunt to Colorado nexy sept.We are backpacking in.Being from the east coast I have no idea what to expect weather wise.What do you guys and gals use.How many layers do you have on hand.What is light weight without the bulk.Everything I have seen so far says have quality rain gear and leave the cotton at home.We are trying to get all the info we can.Planning far enough in advance that we hopefully leave nothing to chance.Thanks in advance.
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Old 07-01-2008, 08:10 PM
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Monie Monie is offline
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Welcome! I'm glad you found us!!

I haven't hunted elk, yet, but we do have resident elk hunters who, I'm sure, will be more than happy to share their knowledge.
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Old 07-01-2008, 08:54 PM
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Colorado Rick Colorado Rick is offline
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So glad you asked. Welcome to the Site.

Colorado weather is... well... in a word. Sybil.

I have been in a swimming pool in mid February, and I have built snowmen in July. Seriously.

Late September, is erradic. First snowfall in the mountains is usually around the end of August to the first week in September. The thing about the mountain storms is not really the severity, although some can be, but the fact that one set of clouds would make you bet your mother's kidneys that you are about be drowned, and it'll blow right over you. Other sets will look like the most benign white puffs of cotton you've ever seen. And just when you think you're positive you see a bunny in the formation... BAM!!! A pipe in the sky bursts and you and all your gear will never be dry again.

This was a short answer about Colorado weather. In 36 years I've seen it all out here. Tornadoes, floods, winds that would knock down Kong, snow as deep as I am tall, snow drifts that bury ranch style homes, rain that would make someone from India say, "I miss the monsoons."

We have these freak storms called micro-bursts that come literally out of nowhere and have been known to down small aircraft in flight. ITS NUTS out here. But the things I've mentioned really are short term things. I've only seen it rain in the mountains for about 10 maybe 15 minutes at a time. But those are the wettest 15 minutes of cold misery you'll ever feel. Then, in September, the winds rip your body to the bone and you swear it'll tear the skin from your face. Then they stop. The sun comes out. And all is well in the universe again.

Sometimes in September, in Denver, you'll be dying because it's so danged hot, then you drive into the hills in the shorts and tank top you started in, praying for a parka. Seriously.

All that said, there is no common weather pattern like you may already have experienced. One day to the next is a meteorologist's nightmare. The weather reports usually go like this:

And now for the weather, here's Bob...

Bob: Yep. We'll have some. Back to you, Jane.

Bring snow gear, but nothing like Admiral Bird... Bring light gear too... but not too light. Nights are CCCCCCCCCCCCOOOOOOOLLLLLLLLLLLDDDDDDD. Period. Penguins were originally from the Rocky Mountains. They moved to the South Pole because it was warmer at night there.

Hope that helps. Just do like the scouts do. Be prepared.
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Old 07-01-2008, 09:43 PM
huntquest huntquest is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado Rick View Post
So glad you asked. Welcome to the Site.

Colorado weather is... well... in a word. Sybil.

I have been in a swimming pool in mid February, and I have built snowmen in July. Seriously.

Late September, is erradic. First snowfall in the mountains is usually around the end of August to the first week in September. The thing about the mountain storms is not really the severity, although some can be, but the fact that one set of clouds would make you bet your mother's kidneys that you are about be drowned, and it'll blow right over you. Other sets will look like the most benign white puffs of cotton you've ever seen. And just when you think you're positive you see a bunny in the formation... BAM!!! A pipe in the sky bursts and you and all your gear will never be dry again.

This was a short answer about Colorado weather. In 36 years I've seen it all out here. Tornadoes, floods, winds that would knock down Kong, snow as deep as I am tall, snow drifts that bury ranch style homes, rain that would make someone from India say, "I miss the monsoons."

We have these freak storms called micro-bursts that come literally out of nowhere and have been known to down small aircraft in flight. ITS NUTS out here. But the things I've mentioned really are short term things. I've only seen it rain in the mountains for about 10 maybe 15 minutes at a time. But those are the wettest 15 minutes of cold misery you'll ever feel. Then, in September, the winds rip your body to the bone and you swear it'll tear the skin from your face. Then they stop. The sun comes out. And all is well in the universe again.

Sometimes in September, in Denver, you'll be dying because it's so danged hot, then you drive into the hills in the shorts and tank top you started in, praying for a parka. Seriously.

All that said, there is no common weather pattern like you may already have experienced. One day to the next is a meteorologist's nightmare. The weather reports usually go like this:

And now for the weather, here's Bob...

Bob: Yep. We'll have some. Back to you, Jane.

Bring snow gear, but nothing like Admiral Bird... Bring light gear too... but not too light. Nights are CCCCCCCCCCCCOOOOOOOLLLLLLLLLLLDDDDDDD. Period. Penguins were originally from the Rocky Mountains. They moved to the South Pole because it was warmer at night there.

Hope that helps. Just do like the scouts do. Be prepared.
This is great advice!!
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Old 07-01-2008, 10:30 PM
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Monie Monie is offline
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So, 10 maybe 20 layers will suffice?
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  #6  
Old 07-02-2008, 09:30 AM
wyote wyote is offline
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CO Rick gave you some good advice. It can be in the 80's one day and snowing the next............or both of those in the same day!!!!!!!!!!!!!

One thing he said you really want to pay attention to is.........when the sun goes down it gets COLD! Which brings up sleeping bags. I personally would bring a bag that is a little heavier than you would think you would need. Theres nothing worse than shivering in a light bag all night long.

Good luck on your hunt
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