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-   -   Fly fishing (http://www.archerschoicemedia.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2486)

cpd realpolice 01-27-2009 05:23 PM

Fly fishing
 
Anyone on the forum do much fly fishing. Thinking of getting into it. Figured it's something I could do and my wife could go along with. She is completely not into hunting and looking for something to do with her.

Monie 01-27-2009 05:25 PM

It's something that my grandfather used to do, and something that I've always wanted to do, but haven't. Maybe one of these days. :)

MJewell 01-27-2009 05:29 PM

Been doing alittle fly fishing for the last seven years. Great way to spend afew hours. I do all mine at the fishing club that I work for so I'm pretty much always catch something.

Best advice I can give you is take a lesson or two if you can find someone in your area that offers that, or if you have friends that flyfish get them to help you get started.

Matt

ts nodak 01-28-2009 06:25 AM

Good advice on the lessons!! NDSU in Fargo offered some evening lessons that helped a ton to not only learn the techniques but also helped out a lot with outfitting a beginner like myself!! Good Luck!!

coorsdrifter 03-01-2009 01:52 PM

Trying to get started in it.I have a Sage rod and all the goodies on order from Cabelas.:D

tiplernorth 06-09-2009 01:43 PM

Been fly fishing for a few years ,best suggestion is have someone give you the basics on using the fly rod , it does take practice ,
I have a target on the grass , which I use to practice with the fly rod , I make sure I hit my target or atleast get close to the target ,

good luck

Colorado Rick 06-10-2009 09:31 AM

Chad this is a VERY expensive sport, but well worth the money once you have the hang of it.

I would suggest purchasing a fairly cheap rod and reel combo first, just to see if you will enjoy it. Find an open spot in a park or something with low grass. Set out a couple of large rings, (I use a few hula hoops), at different distances. Tie a small white piece of foam or white yarn at the end of your line.

Now... this may seem strange... but just trust me on this one. Wear a long sleeve shirt. Take your sleeve and pull it up around the end of the rod behind the reel. It will keep your wrist straight. Feels really wierd at first, but it works like a charm.

NEVER take the rod up past your ear... and NEVER let rod go down past the top of your belly. Say... 11:30 and 9:15 on a clock. ALWAYS go down a little faster than you went up... and you'll be casting like a champ.

Now... Some will say that you need to be able to cast 40 yards of line. HORSE &#!T! Three maybe 4 good pulls should be more than enough to get the job done and still allow you to control the line.

Once you have your casting down, then you want to work on something called Mending. Mending involves flicking the line from the wrist. It's just a simple roll really. Mending keeps the line down stream in line with rod, and you can set the hook much easier.

If you've done spincasting your whole life, you are in for a treat! A hit on a fly rod is MUCH different than a hit on a spincast or baitfish rod. You feel like a 10 ton truck is on the other end. Every time I go out with the fly rod now I have to prepare myself for the strike. It shocks me! What a blast though when you land the first one on a fly rod.

Be prepared to change flies often. Like hunting, you will want to scout. Check the surface for what bugs are present, then try to match them as closely as possible. Sometimes what worked one strike will no longer work the entire day. It's amazing. A week before I go out I am on the water watching for surface activity and noting the time and the water conditions. I ALWAYS stop into a local flyshop and jackjaw a while. Since I tie my own, I can usually buy one or two of the suggested flies and make about 6 of each when I get back home.

BOOTS: Get boots with FELT on the bottom. The rubber soled boots hit moss and slide like crazy. Nothing worse than falling in. It sucks.

Waders: Make sure they are light and airy. The Neoprene waders will KICK YOUR BUTT. You'll be wiped out in an hour. Remember that Fly-fishing is a labor intensive sport. You will constantly be on the move by either changing spots, changing flies, casting... Lightweight waders are a must!

About a month ago my father-in-law and I FINALLY hit the much fabled Caddis hatch here in Colorado on the Arkansas River just east of Pueblo Colorado. AMAZING!!!! ABSOLUTELY AMAZING!!! I had to stop after 6 hours of non-stop flyfishing. I was completely worn out! They say about 20% of the flyfishermen and women in Colorado catch the hatch. What an experience!!

Va Hunter 06-10-2009 11:28 AM

On top of Rick's sound advice, I'd look at a heavier rod instead of one of the lite weight ones. A heavier rod is easier to learn with.
Got any ponds around ya? If so, get some top water cork popping bugs and have a blast! Pan fish and bass flat love 'em and can provide hours of fun. You'll get your casting down pat and relearn how to set the hook, all at one fail swoop.

WallyWorld, BassPro, Cabelas and Dicks Sporting goods all offer entry level kits. Most of the kits will be under $75.


Rick, I wished someone had explained the felt bottoms to me a while back. Them freakin neopreme duck hunting waders ain't worth a dang on moss covered snotrocks. Glad I had the chest belt tightened...

Colorado Rick 06-10-2009 01:23 PM

Hey Robert! Thanks for the reminder on the belt.

Some waders do come with a cinchable belt, but I've found that an old leather one works best.

Chad the idea behind the belt is that when you do fall in... (note the fact that I said when... not if... you will - everyone does) the belt should stop the water from rushing in below the waist.

It's better to fish with a friend in these cases.

#1 - The obvious safety issue.
#2 - It's a real kick to watch folks try and stop the fall when all they have is water around them. Hehe... Go on ahead Master Jedi... use the force. :D

It's also a VERY good idea to never go in above your knees if possible. Between the casting, the moving, fighting the fish, and then fighting a current... you'll get worn out in an awful hurry. The deeper the water... the stronger the current underneath it. Stay out of the deep stuff. Leave that to someone on another site to fall victim to. ;)


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